Nasty Weeds & Pests

Overview

The following weed and pest species pose significant threat to Noosa's plants, animals and fungi. They are capable of invading and degrading native ecosystems.

Early detection of new outbreaks will help us eradicate these plants from Noosa Shire.

12 species

Ambrosia artemisiifolia (Annual Rag Weed)

Native to North America, annual ragweed is a fast-growing, fern-like plant. Annual ragweed can invade and suppress weak and overgrazed pastures, reducing productivity. Its pollen can cause hay fever and aggravate asthma. Annual ragweed is a restricted invasive plant under theBiosecurity Act 2014.... Continue reading

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Anoplolepis gracilipes (Yellow Crazy Ant)

Native to Africa, the yellow crazy ant has a long body and very long legs and antennae. Its name comes from its erratic walking style and frantic movements, especially when disturbed. Yellow crazy ants can disrupt natural environments, affect the horticulture industry, and cause skin and eye irritat... Continue reading

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Baccharis halimifolia (Groundsel Bush)

Native to the USA, groundsel bush is a dense, woody shrub particularly suited to moist and coastal areas. Groundsel bush was introduced to the Brisbane region as an ornamental plant before 1900. Now found in coastal parts of Queensland and northern New South Wales, it competes with both native and ... Continue reading

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Bryophyllum delagoense (Mother-of-Millions)

Bryophyllum delagoense Jackie Miles
Bryophyllum delagoense Jackie Miles
Bryophyllum delagoense Jackie Miles, plantlets on leaf tip
Bryophyllum delagoense
Bryophyllum delagoense
Bryophyllum delagoense

Native to Madagascar, mother-of-millions (Bryophyllum delagoense) is an escaped ornamental plant. Hybrid mother-of-millions (Bryophyllum x houghtonii) is a cross between mother-of millions and Bryophyllum daigremontianum and is also an escaped ornamental. Five Bryophyllum species are naturalised in ... Continue reading

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Native to southern Africa, bitou bush is an attractive, bright green perennial shrub. It occurs in all Australian states and territories except the Northern Territory, and is the dominant vegetation along much of the New South Wales coastline. Bitou bush out-competes and, in many cases, totally elim... Continue reading

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Eichhornia crassipes (Water Hyacinth)

Native to Brazil, water hyacinth was introduced to Australia in the early 1900s as an aquatic ornamental plant. Valued for its floral presentation, water hyacinth was released into ponds and lagoons in public parks throughout Queensland. Today, water hyacinth is one of the world's worst weeds, caus... Continue reading

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Hygrophila costata (Glush Weed)

Native to Mexico and Argentina, hygrophila is a flowering, erect herb that grows on creekbanks and in shallow freshwater wetlands. Hygrophila has now naturalised in New South Wales, and is an emerging problem for Queensland's waterways. The main danger is that aggressive hygrophila growth will pose... Continue reading

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Salvinia molesta (Salvinia)

Salvinia molesta
Salvinia molesta
Salvinia molesta
Salvinia molesta
Salvinia molesta
Salvinia molesta

Native to Brazil, Salvinia molesta is a free-floating aquatic fern. One of several species of salvinia that occur naturally in America, Europe and Asia, it is the only salvinia species to become established in Queensland. It is also found in New South Wales and the Northern Territory. Salvinia form... Continue reading

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Senecio madagascariensis
Senecio madagascariensis
Senecio madagascariensis
Senecio madagascariensis
Senecio madagascariensis
Senecio madagascariensis

Native to southern Africa, fireweed is a daisy-like herb. Fireweed was first recorded in Australia in the Hunter Valley in 1918. It is thought to have arrived in the ballast of ships trading between Australia and Europe via Capetown. Fireweed spread slowly at first, but, in the past 30 years, has ra... Continue reading

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Sporobolus natalensis (Giant Rat's Tail Grass)

Native to Africa, giant rat's tail grass is a long, upright grass that forms large tussocks. Like other weedy sporobolus grasses, it is an aggressive grass that can reduce pasture productivity and significantly degrade natural areas. Giant rat's tail grass was introduced to Australia around the ear... Continue reading

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Sporobolus pyramidalis (Giant Rat's Tail Grass)

Native to Africa, giant rat's tail grass is a long, upright grass that forms large tussocks. Like other weedy sporobolus grasses, it is an aggressive grass that can reduce pasture productivity and significantly degrade natural areas. Giant rat's tail grass was introduced to Australia around the ear... Continue reading

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Thunbergia laurifolia (Laurel Clock Vine)

Thunbergia laurifoliais on theAlert List for Environmental Weeds, a list of 28 non-native plants that threaten biodiversity and cause other environmental damage. Although only in the early stages of establishment, these weeds have the potential to seriously degrade Australia's ecosystems. Thunbergi... Continue reading

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